Missus

missus

What is the meaning of missus?

Definition of missus. 1 informal + old-fashioned : wife … everybody knew Mr. Levov and everybody asked after the missus and the boys.— Philip Roth. 2 British, informal —used to address a woman whose name is not known. 3 dialect : mistress sense 1a.

Why do the words MISS and Missus sound the same?

The words misses, missus, Mrs. sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Why do misses, missus, Mrs. sound the same even though they are completely different words? The answer is simple: misses, missus, Mrs. are homophones of the English language. Plural form of miss. Alternative spelling of missus. (Mrs)

What is the difference between Missus and Mrs?

a spoken form of mistress, meaning a woman who is in charge of a house and servants: The maid said that the missus was unkind to her. US informal (also Missus) a spoken form of Mrs., used when speaking to a woman:

What does his missus tell him about the rent?

Then his missus , as he calls her, tells him that she must have more money for the housekeeping, since the rent has gone up so much. Bespiel aus dem Hansard-Archiv. Enthält Parlamentsinformationen lizenziert unter der Offenen Parlamentarischen Lizenz v3.0

What is a missus?

n 1. the missus informal ones wife or the wife of the person addressed or referred to 2. an informal term of address for a woman [C19: spoken version of Mistress]

When did Mr and Missus become a word?

And, it has created social havoc since “Mrs.” entered mainstream English in the 17 th century. Where did Mister and Missus come from? Mister is a direct variant of master, which in turn comes from the Old English maegester meaning “one having control or authority.”

What is the difference between Missus and Mrs?

a spoken form of mistress, meaning a woman who is in charge of a house and servants: The maid said that the missus was unkind to her. US informal (also Missus) a spoken form of Mrs., used when speaking to a woman:

What is the origin of the word mister?

, which in turn comes from the Old English. maegester. meaning “one having control or authority.” Once used to address men under the rank of knighthood, by the mid-18th century mister became a common English honorific to generally address males of a higher social rank.

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