Lx factory lisbona

lx factory lisbona

What is the history of the LX factory in Lisbon?

LX Factory’s history began in 1846, when one of Lisbon’s most important manufacturing companies, “Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense”, a threads and fabrics company, moved their Lisbon factory to Alcântara. Over time, the city’s industrial heyday passed and the factory was abandoned, falling into disrepair.

What is the LX factory?

The Lx Factory is simple: it is an old tissue factory created in 1846 in the Alcântara district of Lisbon and which has been totally transformed into an industrial complex in a modern context. Before its redevelopment, the Fiaçao e Tecidos company occupied no less than 23,000 m² of the city.

Is there graffiti in Lisbon’s factory grounds?

Along with the graffiti are, there are also actual art installations placed throughout the factory grounds, mostly on the walkways. These are works of local Lisbon based artists who were either commissioned by the city or whose works were found to be apt for the space.

Where to find Lisbon’s street art scene?

Some of LX Factory’s graffiti is easy to find, but some of it is tucked away in places you really have to go looking for it. Lisbon has a thriving street art scene. The street art at LX Factory is of such a high quality that it’s easy to see why the city is establishing itself as such a street art hub.

What is the LX factory in Lisbon?

What is the LX Factory in Lisbon? The LX Factory is a co-operative working venue that is inhabited by restaurants, bars, galleries, bookstores and various concept shops. It is situated right on the edge of the Tagus, halfway between the Cais do Sodre and Belem. DESIGN YOUR PRIVATE LISBON TOUR NOW »

What happened to the LX factory?

The factory complex that makes up the LX Factory was once the manufacturing site for a thread and fabric company in the Alcantara district. Over the decades, other companies began to occupy the space, until it was eventually abandoned and considered an isolated part of the city.

Where to find Lisbon’s street art scene?

Some of LX Factory’s graffiti is easy to find, but some of it is tucked away in places you really have to go looking for it. Lisbon has a thriving street art scene. The street art at LX Factory is of such a high quality that it’s easy to see why the city is establishing itself as such a street art hub.

Where are Lisbon’s Hottest addresses?

A lmost overnight, in 2008, a factory complex dating back to 1846 became one of Lisbon’s hottest addresses. The industrial spaces were turned into offices, and soon came cafés, restaurants and shops.

What is the LX Factory in Lisbon? The LX Factory is a co-operative working venue that is inhabited by restaurants, bars, galleries, bookstores and various concept shops. It is situated right on the edge of the Tagus, halfway between the Cais do Sodre and Belem. DESIGN YOUR PRIVATE LISBON TOUR NOW »

What events have been held at LX factory?

Is there graffiti in Lisbon?

Most graffiti you see in Lisbon is considered public street art, supported and encouraged by the City Council. UnderDogs (co-owned by Vhils, a Portuguese street artist who was listed on Forbes’ 30 under 30) have guided tours in the city, but you can do your own.

Is Lisbon’s street art scene booming?

And Lisbon’s street art scene – propelled by a new generation of home-grown artists and with many mural projects supported by the city government – is booming too. Here’s my round-up of some of the best murals in the city I photographed over two and a half days and where to find them.

Is Lisbon the world’s urban art capital?

Lisbon street art and graffiti – the world’s urban art capital? Boasting large-scale murals by some of the best-known international street artists and home to some remarkable local talent, Lisbon can claim to be the street art capital of the world, says Buenos Aires Street Art ‘s Matt Fox-Tucker. 1. Hyper-realistic mural by Mr Dheo and Pariz One

Is graffiti still a big problem in London?

It was a huge problem here in London up to end of the Nineties but seems to have fallen out of favour. The graffiti you see now tends to be more interesting, rather than annoying “tags”, but those do still occur. I find it depressing when I go to Paris that tagging graffiti is everywhere.

I really started to take notice of all the different street art projects across Lisbon and realised that the capital is like an open art museum and easily one of the best street art spots in Europe. Here are some of the pieces I spotted on the trip, from a graffiti crocodile through to a trash raccoon. Where to stay in Lisbon?

What are the steepest streets in Lisbon?

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